URL Encode

Use This URL Encode Tool For Instant Text Encoding

How to encode URLs so that they are understood by all? You may have already noticed "%20" in your URLs. This code corresponds to a uniform encoding supported by all web servers.

This online URL Encoder tool is highly useful for adding special characters to a URL parameter, commonly known as percent encoding. URL encoding entails replacing unallowable characters with a percent (percent sign) and two additional hexadecimal numbers. While URL decoding is useful for determining the source of an email campaign or newsletter.

How Does Url Encoding Work?

Online URL encoding, also known as Percent-encoding, is a method of encoding specific information in a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) in specific circumstances. Although it is commonly referred to as URL encoding, it is generally used inside the main Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) set, which includes both Uniform Resource Locator (URL) and Uniform Resource Name (URL) (URN).

This online URL encoding is also used in data preparation and HTML form data submission in HTTP queries.

All characters that must be changed are replaced with a percent sign (%) and a two-digit hexadecimal value representing the character in the corresponding ISO character set. Some instances are provided below:

$ (Dollar Sign) becomes %24 + (Plus) becomes %2B
& (Ampersand) becomes %26 , (Comma) becomes %2C
: (Colon) becomes %3A ; (Semi-Colon) becomes %3B
= (Equals) becomes %3D ? (Question Mark) becomes %3F
@ (Commercial A / At) becomes %40  

The Above form allows you to convert a URL from "unified" to a "unified" URL. The initial state of the form is considered "unified". In addition, to allow conversion of current URLs, this small converter does not encode URL syntax characters (the characters ';', '/', '?', ':', '@', '=', '#' and '&' ) ... if you need to convert these characters, read the "Reserved characters" table below to find the appropriate value.

NOTE: This converter uses the String.charCodeAt and String.fromCharCode methods, which are only available in JavaScript version 1.2 or higher, as well.

Special feature of Navigators

  • Internet Explorer is notoriously relaxed in its terms for encoding spaces in URLs. This tends to contribute to author sloppiness to write URLs. Keep in mind that Netscape and Opera are much stricter on this point, and spaces MUST be encoded if the URL is to be considered correct.

What Are The Types of URL Characters?

The characters that can be used in a URI are classified as reserved or unreserved (or a percent sign as part of a percent-encoding). Reserved characters are those that have a specific meaning. A slash character, which is widely used to divide multiple parts of a URL, is an example of this. Unreserved characters, on the other hand, have no specific connotations.

The reserved characters are expressed using unique character arrangements when employing percent-encoding. With each revision of the standards that regulate URIs and URI schemes, the sets of reserved and unreserved characters, as well as the conditions under which particular reserved characters have special meaning, have altered marginally.

url encoder tool

Why Do URL Characters Need To Be Encoded?

ASCII control characters

 

Why:

these characters are not displayable.

Characters:

Contains the characters 00-1F hex or 0-31 dec and 7F or 127 dec from the ISO-8859-1 (ISO-Latin) table.

 

Non-ASCII characters

 

Why:

They are by definition not legal in URLs.

Characters:

Contains the second half of the ISO-Latin table (80-FF hex or 128-255 decimal.)

 

"Reserved characters"

 

Why:

URLs use special characters to define their syntax. When these characters are not used for this purpose, they need to be encoded.

Characters:

Character

Code
(Hex)

Code
(Dec)

The dollar "$"
The and commercial "&"
The plus "+"
The comma ","
The slash "/"
Colon ":"
Semicolon ";"
L'equual "="
Point of Interrogation "?"
The at sign "@"

24
26
2B
2C
2F
3A
3B
3D
3F
40

36
38
43
44
47
58
59
61
63
64

 

"Characters avoided"

 

Why:

Some characters present the possibility of being misunderstood in URLs for various reasons. These characters should always be encoded as well.

Characters:

Characters

Code
(Hex)

Code
(Dec)

Why encode?

Space

20

32

A sequence of spaces can be lost in certain cases (and particularly several spaces)

Quotes
Symbol "<"
Symbol ">"

22
3C
3E

34
60
62

These characters are often used to delimit full text URLs.

Character "#"

23

35

This is used in a URL to indicate a fragment identifier begins (bookmarks / anchors in HTML).

Character "%"

25

37

It is used as an escape character, so it must be encoded itself.

Various characters:
Accolade "{"
Accolade "}"
The pipe "|"
The backslash "\"
The hat "^"
The tilde "~"
The hook "["
the hook "]"
The grave accent "` "


7B
7D
7C
5C
5E
7E
5B
5D
60


123
125
124
92
94
126
91
93
96

Some systems can modify these characters.

How does Percent-encoding of unreserved characters work?

When a reserved set character has special value in a certain context and a URI scheme specifies that it is important to utilise that specific character for a different reason, the character should be percent-encoded.

To percent-encode a reserved character, first convert it to its appropriate ASCII byte value and then express that value as a pair of hexadecimal digits. The digits preceding a percent sign (%) are then used in place of the reserved character in the URI. Non-ASCII characters are often translated to their byte arrangement in UTF-8, and then each byte value is expressed as indicated above.

Reserved characters with no reserved meaning in a given context may be percent-encoded as well, but they are not semantically distinct from those that are not. As an example, consider the following: "/" is still regarded a reserved character, but it normally has no purpose, unless a specific URI scheme states otherwise. This is why a character does not need to be percent-encoded if it serves no purpose.

How Are The Characters Of Encoded Urls Translated?

The encoding of characters in a URL consists of using the "%" character, followed by a two-hexadecimal (case-non-sensitive) representation of the ISO-Latin character code.

Example

  • Space = decimal code 32 in the ISO-Latin table.
  • 32 decimals = 20 in hexadecimal
  • The encoded URL representation will be "% 20"

How To Use This Online Url Encoder?

The SEO Tools free online URL Encoder tool works when you add a string of text on the space/box provided above. Then, all you have to do is to click on the “Encode” or “Decode” button, and it will show the results instantly.

This will come handy when you want to turn encoded JavaScript URL with a barely readable text to a more readable text. The URL normally contains a non-alpha numeric letter or character that will be encoded into “%” (percent symbol), followed by few alphanumeric texts. Then, the white spaces in a text will be encoded by “+” symbol.

URLs can only be carried over to the Internet using the ASCII character-set. Since these URLs comes with characters outside the ASCII set, the URL needs to be converted into a useable ASCII format. This URL encoding is used to replace unsafe ASCII characters with a percent sign (%) followed by two hexadecimal digits. URL encoding replaces a space with either a plus sign (+) or with %20.